Blu-Ray // The Lost City of Z

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UNCHARTED AMAZONIA HOLDS A LOST KINGDOM AND THE FATE OF A BRITISH SOLIDER IN THIS WARTIME ADVENTURE.

On an expedition mapping the border between Brazil and Bolivia, soldier Percy Fawcett (Charlie Hunnam) finds traces of a great civilisation deep in the jungle, but is ridiculed upon return for his lack of evidence. To prove his critics wrong he returns with the Royal Geographical Society to find the lost city of wonder, dubbed “Z”.

As a film that embraces the romance of the unexplored, The Lost City of Z is an impressive piece of modern filmmaking, as it feels and looks like a classic explorer film from a long past era. It nicely strikes the balance between the romantic nature of European “New World” pioneering, while still showing how difficult and unforgiving the jungle can be.

Hunnam plays stoic Fawcett, head of a large family with varying opinions on his ambitions. Tom Holland’s portrayal of his eldest son shows an actor with a great future and Robert Pattinson’s turn as haggard fellow explorer Henry Costin is impressively unrecognisable. Their odyssey, pitted against the outbreak of the Great War, shows the struggle Fawcett faced between leaving his family in England and his battle to right his disgraced family name. It’s a story that could easily be mistaken for fiction, but it’s as true as it is remarkable.

Christopher Spelman’s score is excellent, allowing the beautiful visuals to take over and the sweeping strings in the sombre scenes are genuinely moving. The hazy camerawork compliments the dense jungle, captured in it’s claustrophobic glory. The lucid night sequences were very reminiscent of Apocalypse Now which was clearly a big influence, but thankfully the film has its own distinct character. Director James Gray’s work with “The Beach” cinematographer Darius Khondji is a winning combination, and while the film doesn’t feel like a huge Hollywood blockbusting adventure, neither it should. Sitting far more comfortably as a smaller budget film with an artistic heart.

With some sporadic pacing and a slightly one dimensional performance from Hunnam, The Lost City of Z is not without its flaws. But it’s still a wonderful film, the likes of which has not been seen for a while. The sense of adventure is very genuine and Gray successfully pulls off a very difficult task. How do you make a film about exploring that’s exciting, in an era where no stone has been left unturned?

Author: cultfilmedinburgh

Edinburgh's monthly cult film screening community.

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