Review // Baby Driver

Screen Shot 2017-07-04 at 11.23.48.pngAbsurd yet touching, Edgar Wright’s petrolhead caper pays off in spades.

Atlanta’s finest getaway driver, Baby (Elgort) is indebted to a kingpin who has coerced him since he was a child. Using an iPod to drown out tinnitus, he’s man of few words with an unfortunate past. After falling for a waitress with dreams of hitting the open road together, Baby finds that getting out of crime is hard when it’s all you’ve known.

Edgar Wright, the man behind the acclaimed “cornetto trilogy” might’ve seemed an odd choice to helm a crime thriller set in Georgia, but his clever script crafted around its soundtrack is a perfect fit. Ansel Elgort is fantastic as the enigmatic Baby, but the supporting cast of Kevin Spacey, Jamie Foxx, Lily James and Jon Hamm all show up on top form too. Even the appearances from Flea and the ATL twins work out well and offer more than just ticking boxes.

Unlike most driver films, the cars in Baby Driver are almost irrelevant. Wright and co have chosen to focus on dialogue, music and visuals. Finding so much colour in the concrete metropolis of Atlanta is quite an achievement and the many nods and cameos suggest that Wright has done his homework on the city. The film is a combination of great writing, music supervision and a sharp cinematic eye.

The quirk of using an iPod should feel very dated, but it doesn’t. By featuring music that barely scratches the 21st century, the soundtrack skips this pitfall and is just one of the ways music is woven into the fabric of the film. From the choreographed opening to the closing credits, it’s 2 hours of seamless action orchestration, including some poignant moments, despite what the macho marketing might suggest. The combination of screaming tires and soul music works because the film never takes itself too seriously. Accordingly, there’s a lot of humour, mostly wisecracking, but the jokes add to the film. No surprises considering this is the team who brought you Shaun of The Dead and Hot Fuzz.

Edgar Wright’s direction feels grounded and realistic, despite the very Hollywood nature of the plot. Baby Driver is a significant film for a lot of reasons, perhaps most importantly its survival to be made as was originally intended. While the story itself is hardly original, the presentation is unconventional and must’ve seemed pretty risky on paper to producers. Thankfully this vision was maintained, because there’s never been a film like it and you absolutely shouldn’t miss it.