Review // Song to Song

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A group of intertwined people cavort in the Austin music scene battling vices, heartbreak and derailment along the way.

BV (Gosling) and Faye (Mara) are songwriters working with music tycoon Cooke, (Fassbender) a man of great means but a penchant for control of anyone he crosses paths with (Portman). Their trials and tribulations under the Texas sun show the darker side of stardom and the sacrifices that must be made to succeed in the music world.

With four of today’s biggest stars in a web of artistic and sexual aegis, Song to Song has a hell of a lot of chemistry. But one must first indulge Terrence Malick’s many signature tropes to enjoy it. The film’s basic premise, the quest for success, is fleshed out by his typically existential dialogue and oddly beautiful camerawork. The performances themselves are as we’ve come to expect from some of Hollywood’s greatest assets; convincingly tragic. With Rooney Mara and Ryan Gosling shining in particular.

The soundtrack regularly varies from New Orleans bounce to Saint Saens. A jarring combination that much like the opening 10 minutes of the film, takes a long time to settle. While they’re modern musicians, EDM still feels very out of place when consistently juxtaposed with recognisable classical music, when interludes from the likes of Patti Smith & Lykke Li offer a far more refined musical break.

Despite the cyclical tour-based storyline, the film ticks along nicely and the cinematography from Emmanuel Lubezki is absolutely breathtaking. This is their fifth collaboration and there’s no doubt that they’ve crafted some of the most beautiful films of the last 20 years. However, their “show but don’t tell” style filmmaking has recently left audiences lacking and could definitely be argued for this venture too.

Occasionally distracted but always beautiful. Song to Song takes influence from films like Mulholland Drive and more recently La La Land, asking the age-old question. Is the suffering worth the art?